Welcome to the Hambini Engineering website. This website started off as my place on the internet for me to detail technical aspects of bikes, cars and my love of engineering. This is largely in conjunction with my YouTube channel where content mainly involves bikes and cars.

Recent posts from the Hambini Blog

  • Website Upgrades

    I have been upgrading the website over the past few days. If you have visited during this period, you may have experienced some disruption. 

    Those upgrades have now been completed. 

    Thankyou for your understanding during this time.

    Hambini

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  • Hambini SRAM Dub Bottom Brackets

    For the past few months I have been working with NTN and one of my racing teams in developing a bottom bracket suitable for SRAM dub cranksets. SRAM's Dub is their current bottom bracket standard which uses a 29mm (28.99mm) axle with a bearing landing spacing of ~90mm. The 29mm bore diameter is non standard and no tier 1 bearing manufacturer makes a bearing with a bore of this size.

    SRAM DUB Silver Racing Hambini BB

    In order to accommodate the axle a thin delrin insert was required. This had the advantage of prolonging crank life because the hardened bearing did not come into contact with the relatively soft crank axle. The technical difficulty was manufacturing an insert of only 0.5mm wall thickness at a nominal diameter of 30mm. My competitors were using blow moulded nylon inserts but I found the tolerances on these to be quite poor. Instead I elected to machine the adaptors in delrin. New jigs

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  • Bicycle Wheel Aerodynamics, Which one is fastest!

    Update, more wheels added 01 June 2019

    In terms of drag caused by a bicycle rider, the biggest loss is caused by the rider themselves followed by the wheels and frame.

    The drag caused by wheels is significant because of two fundamental reasons. The first is they hit the air first as they are the most forward part of the bike and second because they are rotating. The effective air speed at the top of a wheel/tyre is double the indicated speed of the bike.

    In the bike industry, wheel aerodynamic testing has generally been conducted by two groups of people - Wheel manufacturers and journalists. Wheel manufacturers will usually adjust tests to make their particular wheels look more favourable than their competitors in testing. This is usually achieved by a combination of adjusting speeds and angles. The reality is this type of test is not impartial.

    Journalists on the other hand tend to visit their local university and ask some clever boffin to

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Sachin Hambini Engineering, S. Varah, Unit 11386, 13 Freeland Park, Wareham Road, Poole, Dorset, UK BH16 6FH